Genetic Determinism and the Innate-Acquired Distinction.

TitleGenetic Determinism and the Innate-Acquired Distinction.
Publication TypeJournal Article
AuthorsKronfeldner, Maria
Journal titleMedicine Studies
Year2009
Pages167–181
Volume1
Abstract

This article illustrates in which sense genetic determinism is still part of the contemporary interactionist consensus in medicine. Three dimensions of this consensus are discussed: kinds of causes, a continuum of traits ranging from monogenetic diseases to car accidents, and different kinds of determination due to different norms of reaction. On this basis, this article explicates in which sense the interactionist consensus presupposes the innate?acquired distinction. After a descriptive Part 1, Part 2 reviews why the innate?acquired distinction is under attack in contemporary philosophy of biology. Three arguments are then presented to provide a limited and pragmatic defense of the distinction: an epistemic, a conceptual, and a historical argument. If interpreted in a certain manner, and if the pragmatic goals of prevention and treatment (ideally specifying what medicine and health care is all about) are taken into account, then the innate?acquired distinction can be a useful epistemic tool. It can help, first, to understand that genetic determination does not mean fatalism, and, second, to maintain a system of checks and balances in the continuing nature?nurture debates.

Languageeng
DOI10.1007/s12376-009-0014-8
Publisher linkhttp://www.springerlink.com/content/72h0t8183p182844/