Publications of Batory, Agnes

Zentai V. National Roma Inclusion Policies in Central and Eastern Europe: Diverging Learning Paths with Residual Outcomes. In: Batory A, Cartwright A, Stone D, editors. Policy Experiments, Failures and Innovations: Beyond Accession In Central and Eastern Europe. Edward Elgar Publishing; in press/forthcoming.
Krizsan A. Translating Domestic violence norms in five countries of East Central Europe. In: Batory A, Cartwright A, Stone D, editors. Policy Experiments, Failures and Innovations Beyond Accession in Central and Eastern Europe. Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing; 2018. p. 66-87. (New Horizons in Public Policy).

Translating Domestic violence norms in five countries of East Central Europe

This chapter looks at norms translation processes in the field of domestic violence. Using data from five countries of East Central Europe (ECE): Bulgaria, Croatia, Hungary, Poland and Romania, proposes a multi-pronged cross-directional international influence model that challenges traditional top down understandings of international influence. I argue that international influence is not direct, linear and top-down but constructed and negotiated in processes of interaction between international actors and domestic agents, where translation processes influence the direction of policy change. International influence provides content to reforms through defining, communicating and monitoring norms, and through facilitating the production of evidence for domestic violence as a policy problem. In order to understand the nature of international influence, we have to look beyond norms transfer at two additional mechanisms through which it impacts domestic policy processes. First, international influence can create ‘political opportunities’ to enable domestic mobilization for policy change. Second, domestic agents are key in translation of international norms. Enabling such agency becomes critical in processes of norms translation. The chapter shows how international influence understood along these lines contributes to variation in policy progress achieved in different contexts.

Monitoring Committees in Cohesion Policy: Overseeing the Distribution of Structural Funds in Hungary and Slovakia

Under European Union (EU) law, Monitoring Committees (MCs) are charged with overseeing the implementation of Operational Programmes. Despite their potential to influence the process of fund disbursement, relatively little is known about the Committees’ operation and their impact in the new member states. This article is an empirical study of how three MCs actually work in Hungary and Slovakia. We find that whilst these bodies have relatively limited oversight capacities and are characterised by a primary concern with procedural compliance with EU requirements, nevertheless, they have an important role in providing significant opportunities for learning, information exchange, expert input and networking.

Re-visiting the Partnership Principle in Cohesion Policy: The Role of Civil Society Organisations in Structural Funds Monitoring

This article investigates the horizontal dimension of partnership arrangements in cohesion policy in three EU Member States: Austria, Hungary and Slovakia. The focus is on the practice of the monitoring committees (MCs), the primary institutional expression of partnership in the distribution of Structural Funds. The main findings are that in each country NGO participation in the MCs remained contentious, the working of the committees was rather formalistic, and the bodies' purpose and role conceptions were ambiguous. The implication is that partnership as currently practised does not live up either to normative expectations suggested by the EU regulation of the committees or to the expectations of civil society partner organizations themselves.